Help Put an End to Puppy Mills in Canada

by Humane Canada
Help Put an End to Puppy Mills in Canada

Hello,

Thank you for your continued support of Humane Canada as we work to improve dog welfare and end puppy mills in Canada. We continue to educate the public through digital campaigns to raise awareness on puppy mills in our country. In August 2022 we kicked off our Tails of Summer campaign to raise funds and recognize that Canada still has a long way to go to improve dog welfare, including our work toward ending puppy mills.

Puppy mills are inhumane high-volume breeding facilities that put profit above welfare. We estimate that there are thousands of active inhumane breeders across Canada and research shows there are 2000 known puppy mills in Quebec alone. Many of these are located in rural areas, which are difficult for humane society or SPCA inspectors to uncover. Life in a small, cramped cage with poor sanitation and no love or attention is no life at all for these dogs. Humane Canada continues to advocate to government to tackle this issue.

Humane Canada hosted a joint meeting with Humane Societies and SPCA’s to discuss the challenges that our member shelters are facing. We are working to provide solutions to pressing issues like the alarming post pandemic trend in pet surrenders which includes an unprecedented number of dogs. Our members are overwhelmed and facing challenges in rehabilitating dogs suffering from a lack of socialization, aggression, or costly medical conditions that are likely due to poor breeding and puppy mills. These dogs need skilled support and time to work through issues, before they are ready for adoption - which can be a big challenge for many shelters with limited resources.

Humane Canada offers a “What to Know Before Getting A Dog” toolkit on our website, which highlights ways to recognize and avoid puppy mills and choose legitimate, safe breeders or adoption facilities. By educating the public about puppy mills we can help put a halt to the demand for these inhumane breeding facilities. We also continue to work collaboratively with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to reduce the impact of puppy mills and the importation of puppies from overseas.

From the bottom of our hearts, thank you for your continued support of Humane Canada, we truly value your generous contribution and effort to raise awareness of puppy mills in Canada.

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Thank you so much for your support as we continue to work toward ending puppy mills and educating the public on issues dogs are facing in our country.

The final results are in from our recent public awareness campaign to educate the public on Puppy Mills.  This partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), was created to educate Canadians looking to add a new pet to their family, including the warning signs of a potential puppy mill, dog importation, and encouraging adoption.

We can proudly say that this campaign reached an audience of 1.6 Million on social media during January 24-March 31, 2022, greatly raising awareness about puppy mills & other issues affecting dogs in our country. Of those 1.6M, 77,720 people visited our web page link for more information. In addition to social media, we created Google ads targeted at those who are looking for a new pet and 39,599 people visited the webpage link through those ads. That is at least 117,319 Canadians who have gained new knowledge about puppy mills and dog importation, so they can make informed choices when chosing a pet.

By educating the public on other options and potential risks of acquiring a dog of unknown or imported origin, the hope is more people will chose to adopt from a reputable shelter and do their research before buying from a breeder.  We are giving Canadian’s informed choices to consider when getting a new pet, including the ‘What to Know Before Getting a Dog” tool kit on our website, that includes important considerations when adding a new dog to your family.

The CFIA regulates humane transport and dog imports coming into Canada. In 2021, the CFIA made important changes to the laws regarding the importation of puppies under 8 months of age into Canada, including the breeding and re-sale of dogs. Those changes improved compliance with humane transport and animal health requirements.

We will continue to update you on the important work we are doing to educate the public about puppy mills and dog importation in our country.  If you know someone looking to add a new furry member to their family, we encourage you to share our resources and tool kit with them.  The more we spread awareness, the less demand there will be on these unethical sources of breeding and selling dogs.

Thank you for all your support!

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Hello,

First, thank you so much for your support of Humane Canada as we continue our crusade to end puppy mills. We would like to update you on our ongoing public education campaign in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), to encourage the public to do their due diligence when considering a new pet.

In December 2021 Humane Canada created an ad campaign to raise awareness about the risks of buying a dog from an unknown or imported origin. Our key audience for this campaign were Canadians’ considering acquiring a dog by using online services and media coverage of our outreach activities. Key performance objectives were to create awareness when looking for a dog, learning about potential risks, campaign views & shares on social media and page views of related material on the Humane Canada and CFIA websites.

We are happy to share that this campaign reached 2,112,278 people over an 18-day period! By shining a light on the risk factors to look out for when purchasing a dog and promoting the option of using local shelters and responsible rescues for pet adoption, rather than buying imported or dogs of unknown origin, we are giving Canadian’s informed choices to consider when getting a new pet. We are pleased to say that we have also updated our website to better educate the public about Puppy Mills, by creating a ‘What to Know Before Getting a Dog” tool kit that includes important considerations when adding a new dog to your family.

Our messaging aligns with the CFIA’s role in regulating humane transport and dog imports coming into Canada. In May 2021, the CFIA made important changes to the laws regarding the importation of puppies under 8 months of age into Canada, including the breeding and re-sale of dogs. Those changes improved compliance with humane transport and animal health requirements.

With your ongoing support, Humane Canada will continue to educate the public on how to avoid puppy mills and encourage using animal shelters, rescues and ethical, humane sources when bringing a new pet home. Thank you for all your support!

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Hello,

Together with donors and supporters, Humane Canada has been a tireless advocate in the fight to put an end to the cruelty of puppy mills.  We understand that government will play a significant role in ensuring that laws and enforcement support this important work across Canada.  During the recent election campaign, we saw our efforts realized as one of our major parties promised to ban puppy mills and included our recommendations to stop the import of animals bred inhumanely and to strengthen the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s ability to enforce current regulations and seize animals when imported under poor welfare conditions.  

The elected Liberal government also made several promises to support the welfare of animals.  These animal welfare inclusions marked a historical milestone.  This was the first time in known history that animal welfare has made it into any political party platform, and we saw all major party platforms include animal provisions in their campaigns. This is a significant indication that politicians are now recognizing that issues like puppy mills are important topics that Canadians truly care about.   

Humane Canada continues to speak up for animals and we have made several policy recommendations to political stakeholders to address the issue of puppy mills in Canada. Our proposed solutions to tackle the low-welfare, high volume supply of puppies, recognizing that more oversight and effective laws around breeding, selling, importing, and transporting companion animals are required including:  

  • Banning commercial third-party sale in Canada; directing people to buy direct from a licenced breeder or adopt from a rescue or animal shelter.
  • Ban the commercial importation of puppies into Canada. 
  • Strengthen CFIA resources to enforce current regulations and seize animals when imported under poor welfare conditions.
  • Regulations to address on-line pet scams and false claims. 

58% of Canadian households have a dog or cat. There are 7.7 million owned dogs in Canada.  Demand for companion animals, and in particular for dogs, surged during the Covid 19 pandemic further fuelling animal welfare concerns involved in the international and Canadian puppy mill market.  

With your ongoing support Humane Canada will continue its crusade to end puppy mills in Canada. In addition to our legal and enforcement work, we are educating the public in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, to encourage Canadians to be diligent when searching for a dog, to empower and educate the public to watch for red flags and not inadvertently support a puppy mill or puppy broker. 
 
Thank you foryour ongoing support of our crusade to end puppy mills in Canada. 

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happy puppy running outside
happy puppy running outside

In June of 2020 Humane Canada was spurned into action to shine a light on the plight of imported pandemic puppies when at least 38 puppies died in a shipment of 500 dogs on a flight from Ukraine, prompting an investigation by the CFIA that led to a change in federal rules that restricted imports from Ukraine to puppies over eight months old. 

We are pleased to share that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has now made important changes to the laws regarding the importation of puppies under 8 months of age into Canada. These changes apply to the breeding and re-sale of dogs, which include adoption and animal welfare organizations.  

These changes are to improve compliance with humane transport and animal health requirements. This review was initiated after the inspection of an air shipment of dogs in June 2020, in which a number of dead, sick and suffering dogs were found. The on-going investigation into that incident led the CFIA to take enforcement actions. 

As of May 15, 2021, permits will be issued by the CFIA with changes including:  

Multiple entry permits will be replaced with single entry permits, and importers will have to specify the number of dogs to be imported. 

Kennel of origin must be certified by an official veterinarian. 

Dogs will require rabies vaccination at least 28 days before export to Canada and will need to be treated for internal and external parasites prior to export. 

Importers will be required to provide information about the travel route from the country of origin to the final destination in Canada.  They will also be required to schedule a CFIA inspection at the airport or land border crossing where the animals enter Canada. 

Importers transporting dogs by air must have a post-import quarantine facility that has been pre-approved by the CFIA in case arriving animals require further inspection and/or quarantine. 

Permits can only be obtained through mycfia.org.  
 
If importers are found non-compliant, or the puppies don’t meet the health and vaccine requirements to enter into Canada, the puppies will be shipped back to their country of origin. 

While these are important improvements for the protection of puppies, please note that the CFIA has indicated that they will return puppies of non-compliant importers back to the importers, once the regulations have been met, or to their port of origin. Both of these scenarios raise animal welfare concerns depending on the age, physical and emotional health and conditions the puppies were raised and shipped in.  

 Humane Canada continues their public education campaign in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, to encourage the public to do their due diligence when searching for a dog, the goal is to empower and educate the public to look out for red flags and not support a puppy mill or puppy broker inadvertently. 

Thank you for joining us in our crusade to end puppy mills in Canada.  

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Humane Canada

Location: Ottawa, ON - Canada
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @humanecanada
Project Leader:
Barbara Cartwright
Ottawa, ON Canada
$3,775 raised of $10,000 goal
 
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