Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!

by Pan African Sanctuary Alliance
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Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!
Use Movies to Teach Africans to Protect Wildlife!

Dear friends,

I want to take a moment to thank you so much for your dedication to using movies to protect great apes and monkeys across Africa. Because of your unbelievable support, PASA member wildlife centers have rescued dozens of orphaned animals since the start of this year.   

Each of these innocent animals has endured a world of pain, often witnessing their mothers killed to be butchered and eaten. Too small to be sold for meat, these orphans were tied up and caged, kept as novelty pets or sold on the black market.

Thanks to the support of compassionate people like you all over the world, these apes and monkeys are now receiving care, nourishing food, and veterinary treatment at PASA member sanctuaries.

By collaborating with law enforcement agencies to confiscate and rescue animals and arrest the traffickers, PASA members play a critical role in fighting the illegal wildlife trade.

Baby Gorilla Gets a Second Chance

Bobga, a baby gorilla, was tiny when his mother and family were slaughtered for meat as they tried to protect him. He seemed doomed to spend his remaining days as an illegal pet, without appropriate food or care.
 
Your support meant Bobga could be rescued! He was given a safe haven at Limbe Wildlife Centre, a PASA member in Cameroon, and every day Bobga is growing stronger. He loves to play and bond with his caregiver.

We even have a video of Bobga playing with a water tub for the first time! Click here to see this precious moment. Bobga is just one of the many lives you save when you donate to PASA and our member sanctuaries.

PASA donors save lives everyday – will you join our movement?

As the threats to the existence of great apes are increasing, your help is needed more than ever. Join PASA as we fight to protect Africa's threatened and endangered primates!


Very best wishes,
Gregg Tully
Executive Director
Pan African Sanctuary Alliance

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Children in D.R. Congo watching edutainment films
Children in D.R. Congo watching edutainment films

Dear friends,

 

Thank you so much for making it possible to use edutainment films to protect Africa’s great apes and monkeys.

 

An estimated 3,000 great apes are lost from the wild every year, and millions of acres of their habitat disappear every month. Furthermore, the horrific and rapidly growing bushmeat trade is now considered the greatest danger to the future of Africa’s wildlife. The threats to great apes are particularly imminent in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the only nation that is home to all of Africa’s great apes. Recent research found a shocking decline in eastern lowland gorillas of 77 percent since 1995 and a decline in eastern chimpanzees of 22 to 45 percent.

 

A root cause of these threats to great apes is a pervasive lack of awareness among the people of Africa about conservation. Many are unaware that the hunting and consumption of wildlife is robbing Africa of its natural heritage, that many species are alarmingly close to extinction, and that the current rate of habitat loss will soon leave Africa without enough forest to sustain some species.

 

 

The edutainment films

 

The Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA)’s Edutainment Films Program addresses this issue. In collaboration with our member organizations across Africa and a number of filmmakers, we are widely distributing edutainment films that are highly entertaining and engaging and contain messaging about wildlife conservation. PASA has secured the rights to distribute more than 25 films free of charge, most of which are in French as well as English. The majority were made in Africa for African audiences and address conservation issues that are highly relevant to the everyday lives of African communities. The fact that the films are enjoyable facilitates distributing them on a large scale, capturing people’s attention, and producing lifelong changes in their attitudes and behaviors that affect wildlife.

 

The films address topics such as the illegal hunting and snaring, arrests and imprisonment of poachers, consequences of trafficking wild animals and wildlife products, the illicit pet trade, ways to resolve human-wildlife conflict, and habitat exploitation. Some of the videos provide viewers with the animals’ perspective, to instill empathy and teach them that animals have the capacity to suffer. Many of the plots feature African children who make meaningful changes that protect wildlife, which inspires and motivates African youth who watch the films.

 

Implementation of the program

 

The goal of the program is to protect great apes from extinction by educating millions of people throughout Africa about the illegal hunting of endangered species, illicit pet trafficking, habitat destruction, and other conservation issues, and inspiring them to take action. Your support has made it possible to implement this program in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where lack of public awareness is a significant barrier to reducing the wildlife trade and habitat loss.

 

Because of your support, the program has reached 29,932 people (16,580 children and 13,352 adults) in D.R. Congo and motivated them to change their current and future actions in ways that reduce their negative effects on great apes and their habitat. Because parents act as models for their children, the program’s impact is expected to persist for generations.

 

Each of the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance’s member organizations in the Democratic Republic of Congo has a deep understanding of the local culture and has connections with school administrators, government officials, and other influential people that result from working in a country for decades. After obtaining permission from administrators in education departments and schools, PASA members largely distributed the edutainment films by integrating them into their diverse outreach and education programs in schools and in communities, using their existing program infrastructure to maximize the reach of the films.

 

Lwiro Primate Rehabilitation Centre (CRPL) in South Kivu, eastern D.R. Congo, is in a hotspot of biodiversity. Their staff added the films as a component of their education programs in order to provide a new approach to conservation education. They use the films to inspire teachers as well as students in 14 schools around Kahuzi-Biega National Park, as well as Roots & Shoots clubs for youth who want to protect animals and the environment. Many schools in the area lack televisions and computers, but you enabled PASA to provide Lwiro with projectors, extra batteries, and related equipment so they can show the films in areas without infrastructure.

 

Lola ya Bonobo is located outside D.R. Congo’s capital of Kinshasa. Lola runs education programs that engage students and teachers in schools throughout the Kinshasa area, including “kindness for nature” clubs. They also hosts school groups, “kindness for nature” clubs, and other visitors at their sanctuary. Lola’s community awareness programs surrounding the Ekolo ya Bonobo conservation area, which is their bonobo reintroduction site in a remote area of D.R. Congo, reach tens of thousands of people.

 

Lola integrated the edutainment films into all of these education and awareness activities. Their staff use projectors and batteries provided because of your support to show the films even in the absence of electricity. Around Ekolo ya Bonobo, they often show the films in village centers and markets, and many residents of all ages come out to watch. Following screenings of the films, Lola’s outreach staff host discussions that reinforce the films’ lessons.

 


 

Evaluation of the Program’s Impact

 

A subset of program participants is selected to participate in the program evaluation. We use a pre-test/post-test format that consists of asking the same questions before and after the program to show changes in responses to each question. The evaluation questions were designed to assess people's actions, behaviors, and opinions, more than their knowledge, in order to determine the program’s effects on wildlife. The questions include diverse topics such as consuming bushmeat, keeping wildlife as pets, and empathy for animals.

 

We compared the responses to each question in the pre-test and post-test. Of the 18 questions that indicate people's appreciation for wildlife and nature and their understanding of threats to conservation, respondents demonstrated increases in 15 questions, with
changes of up to 63%.

 

Highlights include:

• An increase from 50% to 89% of respondents who said they would never eat bushmeat from any wild animal

• An increase from 37% to 100% of respondents who said they know that eating ape bushmeat can make them sick

• An increase from 60% to 100% of respondents who said it is better to grow food than hunt wild animals

 

Furthermore, through conversations with leaders of the PASA member organizations, we learned about effective implementation of the program and the resources needed, which enables us to improve the methodology and increase the program’s conservation impact in future years.

 

The implementation of the program and the evaluations are ongoing. We will conduct further assessments to determine the long-term results of the program on people's behaviors that have effects on conservation.

 

Conclusion

 

The Edutainment Films Program has already reached 29,932 people in D.R. Congo, and because PASA member organizations are continuing to show the films to large audiences, the program is expected to influence many more in the coming years. The conservation value of your support for the program will continue indefinitely.

 

On behalf of the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance and our member wildlife centers across Africa, I would like to thank you for your invaluable support. You have made it possible to provide innovative, engaging lessons in conservation to tens of thousands of African youth, in addition to enabling us to launch a program in D.R. Congo which will continue for many years to come.

 

All best wishes,

Gregg Tully
Executive Director
Pan African Sanctuary Alliance

gregg@pasaprimates.org

+1 971 712 8360

pasaprimates.org
facebook.com/pasaprimates

A scene from "Ajani's Great Ape  Adventures"
A scene from "Ajani's Great Ape Adventures"
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Education Is the Key to Stopping the Threats to African Wildlife.


PASA and our member wildlife centers across Africa are running a pioneering program that uses high-quality, engaging films to teach conservation and empathy for animals.


Our goal is to protect wildlife and its habitat by changing the behavior of millions of people across Africa. We have approval to use more than a dozen films that were made for African audiences, and we’re continually seeking more.


Since the films are entertaining, our members can arrange for them to be shown on national TV, in schools, on public transportation, and at their rescue centers.


Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage, a PASA member in Zambia, has a thriving community education program. They even built a school so that 120 local children – many of whom have parents who work at the Orphanage – can have a proper education.


Furthermore, Chimfunshi has developed an adult literacy program which empowers the local women of the community.


Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage recently showed the first episode of Ajani’s Great Ape Adventures to the children in their school, as well as adults, who all watched it enthusiastically. Chimfunshi’s education staff will show more edutainment films throughout the school year, and the students will fill out surveys so we can assess what they’ve learned about animal welfare and environmental conservation.


We Can’t Do It Without You.


Chimfunshi is eager to expand the program to five more schools and to their new Conservation Education Club. However, funding is needed to make this possible.


Additionally, the native language in the area is Bemba and many people have a limited understanding of English. For them to fully absorb the messaging, we need to translate the films into Bemba.


By donating, you will make it possible to record a translation of a different film every month,making the films accessible to people throughout Africa.


With your monthly contribution of $20, each month you’ll enable a new classroom of students to watch films about animal protection and do activities that build on the lessons in the films.


We can educate millions of people to protect animals throughout Africa – but only with your help.   

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The Super Kodo videos are new additions
The Super Kodo videos are new additions

The Pan African Sanctuary Alliance is an association of 22 member organizations in 13 African countries, supported by a global network of specialists. PASA's achevements to rescue and protect Africa's great apes and monkeys are only possible because of the contributions of compassionate people like you.

The Pan African Sanctuary Alliance is ideally positioned to effect large-scale change to conserve humanity’s closest relatives. They’ve never needed our help more urgently than right now.

Thanks to you, PASA’s Edutainment Films Program has been wildly successful. Nature for Kids, a nonprofit organization that makes films with messages about wildlife conservation and environmental protection, produced three excellent videos for African youth about a boy named Ajani who learns the importance of protecting great apes. Sanaga-Yong Rescue Center, a PASA member organization in Cameroon, arranged for the videos to be shown to an audience of 75,000 people on Cameroon’s train system and many more on national television.

Now PASA is collaborating with 10 member organizations in 8 African countries to use these films to inspire and educate hundreds of thousands of people. Expanding the program to each new country requires support to buy projectors and laptops, and for transportation for education staff to go to schools. Thank you so much for making it possible. We hope you will continue to help this urgently needed program.

Children in Zambia enjoying the films
Children in Zambia enjoying the films

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Edutainment films in rural African schools
Edutainment films in rural African schools

I'm writing to tell you how PASA is using your generous donation for our Edutainment Films Program in Africa. Recently, we've expanded the program to the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The Edutainment Films Program is a unique approach to reducing illegal wildlife trafficking, which can readily be replicated across Africa. Education is an essential component of conservation, and people tend to learn more and retain more if they enjoy the learning process. PASA, in collaboration with our member organizations across Africa and a number of filmmakers, is widely distributing high-quality “edutainment” films in schools, at sanctuaries, on national television, and in other venues. The films, many of which were created in Africa for African audiences, have conservation messages that educate and inspire Africans to protect great apes and their habitat. Topics include illegal hunting, the illicit pet trade, and habitat exploitation. The goal of the program is to protect great apes by influencing millions of Africans.

You're making it possible to conduct the program in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is the most important country for great ape conservation. PASA’s three member organizations in the DRC – JACK Sanctuary, Lola ya Bonobo, and Lwiro Primate Rehabilitation Centre – are implementing the program based on their existing outreach and education programs, connections, and other resources.

JACK Sanctuary is in the center of the city of Lubumbashi in southern DRC. In its urban location, the sanctuary receives many visitors, including expatriates living in the Congo who are likely to buy primates as pets, soldiers and government officials who are positioned to reduce the threats to wild apes, and Congolese people who may hunt and/or consume bushmeat. JACK’s thriving education program for its visitors, which particularly targets children, has now incorporated edutainment films. Your support is making it possible to provide a battery-powered projector, tablets, and external batteries, so the staff can consistently show films to visitors despite Lubumbashi’s unreliable electricity. PASA is in discussions with JACK about how to expand their use of the edutainment films and how PASA can provide additional support.

Lola ya Bonobo is located outside DRC’s capital of Kinshasa. PASA has provided French versions of a wide range of films to Lola’s staff. Lola runs education programs in collaboration with Kinshasa schools, hosts visitors at their sanctuary, and manages diverse conservation programs at their bonobo release site in Basankusu. They are interested in showing the films to all three of these audiences and we expect to have measurable results in the near future.

Lwiro Primate Rehabilitation Centre (CRPL) in South Kivu, eastern DRC, is situated in a hotspot of biodiversity. Lwiro’s staff conducts education programs in 14 schools around Kahuzi-Biega National Park and they are enthusiastic about how the Edutainment Films Program will strengthen their existing programs. Because of you, Lwiro’s staff is now able to show the films in these schools and to Roots and Shoots clubs in the region. As many schools in the area lack televisions and computers, PASA will provide Lwiro with projectors, extra batteries, and related equipment as soon as possible.

On behalf of PASA and our member wildlife centers in Africa, I would like to thank you for the generous support which is making it possible to bring the Edutainment Films Program to three regions of the Democratic Republic of Congo and help protect great apes from extinction.

All best wishes,
Gregg Tully
Executive Director
Pan African Sanctuary Alliance

gregg@pasaprimates.org
+1 971 712 8360
pasaprimates.org
facebook.com/pasaprimates

Children learn to feel compassion for animals
Children learn to feel compassion for animals

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Organization Information

Pan African Sanctuary Alliance

Location: Portland, OR - USA
Website:
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Twitter: @pasaprimates
Project Leader:
Gregg Tully
Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA)
Portland, OR United States

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