Aug 29, 2019

The Cycle Begins Again

Current and Former students of CDC
Current and Former students of CDC

With the end of summer approaching, students are returning to school.  Each year at Centro de Compartimiento means a new group of students and new challenges.  Once again this year we have mostly college-age young women, but some who are also just beginning high school.  As we reported in June, Aided was going to take her entrance exam to the Elta Technological Institute to study renewable energy.  We were so excited when she told us that she had been accepted into the program.  Then we had even more good news that the school opened a satellite campus in the town of El Espinal which is much closer to Juchitan than is Union Hidalgo.  Aided asked for and was granted a change of campus and now will have fewer travel expenses.

The Centro de Compartimiento residential program is designed to provide room board and emotional support to young women who have to leave their villages to attend high school or university.  The student's families continue to support their daughters with school costs, transportation, and other personal needs.  The families also help our the program with occasion service projects, as the rainy season began, several of our students' fathers came in to help cut the weeds that grow fast and furious once the rains start. 

Even with our support and their families, some students still need funds for the school year.  Several of the students work with family members who own businesses and many local students spend the summers in Huatulco, a nearby resort town, working in small shops or hotels over the summer. This summer Heydi spent working with her uncle who designs and makes traditional regional dresses, Aided helped out in our cafe here in Juchitan and Amayrani went to work is a store in Huatulco.   

As we celebrated our 14th anniversary this summer, we were once again able to connect former students with our current students.  We can help and support the young women in our program but one of the greatest assets that we have as an organization is our graduates.   Some of our former students still live in Juchitan or nearby, though many have moved back to their home towns to work, or moved to a big city for better opportunities.  Several of those who live nearby have become friends and mentors to our current residents.  We value our former students, who are great motivators for your current students.  It is great for them to hear the stories of the older women who came from family and an economic situation similar to their own,  

We would also like to thank you, our other great asset, with your support we have been serving young women in Southern Mexico to dream our about a different future and work toward their goals for the past fourteen years.  Please visit us on our Facebook Page, Centro de Compartimiento, AC for more information and updates on the current school year.    

Maylit and Heydi
Maylit and Heydi
Heydi At Her Summer Job
Heydi At Her Summer Job
Heydi and her uncle
Heydi and her uncle
Jun 4, 2019

Casa Isabel Repaired

Casa Isabel
Casa Isabel

Thanks to your generous donations we have completed the repairs on our program center Casa Isabel located in El Espinal, Oaxaca.  100% of the funds needed were donated and matched through GlobalGiving.
You gave us over $5000 and GlobalGiving matched that amount in January.

The funds were used in part to repair and paint Casa Isabel.  Most of the walls on the first floor were damaged.  The stuccoing was removed, the cracks repaired, and then new stuccoing was applied.  We were worried that after we removed the stuccoing from some of the pillars we would find structural damage, but we did not. 

All the bathrooms needed repairs. On the second floor the structure that held our sinks fell and needed to be replaced, the walls and tiles in the first-floor bathroom had cracked and were also repaired and tile replaced.  We completely remodeled the bathroom in the laundry house, it was not damaged but was very old and needed new tiles, walls, and fixtures.  Now we are back to four nice bathrooms.  We also discovered that the old septic tank walls had been damaged in the quakes, and after two rainy seasons, we had a big hole in our back yard.  The workers uncovered the tank, that at been unused for over 20 years, opened a hole in the top and dumped all the rubble from the stucco removal, which filled the tank quite well and reduced our costs in hauling away the rubble. 

We have used about six thousand of the funds to repair Casa Isabel, the remainder of the funds will go to remove rubble and repair the property walls at our program center in Juchitan.  Next week we are meeting with the owner of the property next door to see about the next step in our repairs.  

We would like to thank all the donors who made the repairs possible. Without you, our building in El Espinal would still be unusable.

New Stucco
New Stucco
May 30, 2019

The End of Another School Year

Aided
Aided

After nearly eight months with no rain, the rain is forecasted every day next week.  This is normal in our region, we have very distinct rainy and dry seasons.  Our seasons divide into rainy, windy and hot, instead of warm and cold.  We are grateful for the rain. All of our student´s families rely on a good rainy season for their crops and food for their livestock. 

When the rains come it is nearly the end of the school year.  The students are heading into their final month of school.  After three years with Centro de Compartimiento (CDC), Aided will graduate from high school.  Her father is a farmer and her mother is a housewife. Aided (pronounced A-ee-ded) is the following the footsteps of her cousin Maylit who completed her college degree while in our residential program CDC. Aided wants to study an engineering degree in renewable resources.  Unlike in the US where students know months ahead of time which school they will attend.  Aided will have her entrance exam at the end of June and not know if she has been accepted until later in July.  

 A university opened a branch in Union Hidalgo about 20 minutes from Juchitan. The program is new and was set up to prepare local young people to take over the work at the wind farms that are being built in the region.  Right now we have many workers from other parts of Mexico and abroad. We are not yet sure if all this development is a boon or a bane for our communities here. We hope that in the future with more local people involved the companies will create healthier relationships with the local communities.  

Thanks to the support of donors like you, Aided was able to complete high school and is now looking at a different future.  We asked her how many of the students from her middle school class in her village had completed high school and were going on to college.  She said only about 20% had finished high school and she was the only one with dreams of college.  Three of her classmates are married and already have children.  Aided loves her home village and wants to stay in the region, but she wants a different future where she and her family are not struggling day to day to make ends meet.  For farmers, the biggest issue is the rain too much or too little and the crop fails, last year her father invested in a new tomatoes farm but lost the crop due to draught.   

Aided's new area of study depends on the weather as well, the sun and the wind.  So far we have been lacking neither in the region.  Thank you for walking with our students as they dream new dreams, for themselves and their families. 

Wind Farms Near Juchitan
Wind Farms Near Juchitan

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